Sponsor Licence Application 

In order to sponsor non EU workers to work for you in the UK, you need to apply for a sponsor licence.

1. Are you eligible to apply for a sponsor licence?

    Call or email us to check your eligiblity to apply for a sponsor licence.

2. What kind of sponsor licence?

If your organisation has a number of different offices, locations or campuses, you can choose how you want to register as a sponsor: you can apply for a single licence, which includes your head office and all branches in the UK; each branch can applying for a separate licence; or you can apply for multiple licences, but each of these licences can cover a group of branches. If you apply for a licence to cover a group of branches, you must give the names and addresses of all the branches that you want to include.

3. Be clear about who will do what As a potential sponsor, you must allocate some responsibilities to members of your staff. There are 4 roles: authorising officer level 1 user level 2 user key contact You must decide who will fill these roles. The section on key personnel contains more information.

4. Know who is working for you already The online sponsor application form will ask whether you are currently employing migrant workers from outside the European Economic Area and Switzerland. You can supply an estimate rather than an exact figure, but you should include any overseas nationals who have been granted settlement (known as 'indefinite leave to remain') in the UK.

5. How many people will you need?

You must estimate the number of certificates of sponsorship that you expect to issue in the next year. You can use your past take-up of work permits, your turnover of staff and any expansion plans as guides. Do not forget to check whether any of your existing work permit holders will require an extension in the coming 12 months. Be aware that there is a limit on the number of certificates of sponsorship that can be issued in some categories.

6. Check that you can keep up with the duties.

You will need to show that you have the right human resources (HR) systems in place to comply with your sponsorship duties. This does not mean that you need a formal HR department, but you must have systems in place to keep track of who is working for you, where they are and the conditions of their work. For more information, see the How we assess HR systems and compliance page. Some employers struggle to provide evidence that they: are following the procedures outlined in our guidance on preventing illegal working, which will enable them to protect themselves from penalties for employing illegal workers; have systems in place to keep migrant workers' contact details (address, phone and mobile phone) up to date; have systems in place to monitor migrants sufficiently (for example, with regular contact if they work at client sites or from home); and have a suitable procedure for their size, type and structure to ensure that the designated responsible person is informed of any circumstances which should be reported to us, and then does so.